Story writing is one of the oldest forms of effective communication and its power stands true even today. Sometimes what we write is good, but not good enough to truly convince the reader or make them take a decisions. This course by Nick Usborne on Selling Stories -For Content Writers and Copywriters is perhaps a must enroll course not just for serious writers, but for everybody looking at enhancing their skills using story telling.
But sometimes what I love the most, is just blogging about what I want to blog about. It’s that complete freedom to explore unknown creative or linguistic territories – with no brief to follow or project manager breathing down my neck. I’m definitely going to make more time to knock up fabulous blog posts in the near future and distant future. So watch this space 🙂

Content Marketing is one of those fields that are expanding day by day and seems to have a huge demand. So this platform has come up with a series of 59 courses and training to cater to your needs. Focusing on the various features of this topic such as social media, foundations, podcasting, newsletters and more, it is certain that there is a lot to learn based on different levels of difficulties. By the end of your chosen program, you will possess the skill to work on relevant projects.
In recent years, as businesses and marketers realized how important content writing and keywords were to their online campaigns, they filled websites with pages with keyword-stuffed nonsense that attracted search engine spiders. Today, those spiders are smarter and writers must write for their audience, not search engines. Luckily, advancements in search algorithms have brought common sense back to marketing. Good writing is an invaluable skill for marketers today for no fewer than these seven reasons:
I write a lot of product review articles and I can attest to what a valuable resource Amazon reviews are. I have also found the “Questions Asked by Customers’ section to be a gold mine. The questions are asked by people who are considering buying the product and are answered by the sellers and, importantly, by people who have actually bought and used the product. I get ideas for most of my subheads from there.
Regardless of team size, it's common for visual content to be created by nearly everyone except, perhaps, the SEO specialist. While designers will do the bulk of the advanced creative work, bloggers, content creators, and social media managers will all get involved in lighter-weight design. Often, designers will also create templates for the writers on the team so they can be more independent -- like creating ebook templates so premium content can be laid out by just about anyone with an InDesign license.
You'll need some analytics for your website and blog so you can measure your content marketing performance against your goals. Some content marketing teams rely on Google Analytics, others rely on more robust closed-loop solutions that make it easy to tie content marketing activities at the top of the funnel to revenue. I recommend the latter if you want to use metrics to prove the success of your content marketing program so you can secure more budget and grow the team. If you're looking for an easy way to share numbers across your organization, look into DataHero. This tool integrates with the HubSpot software and allows you to track, visualize, and share your analytics through customized dashboards and charts. 
Infographics. These are generally long, vertical graphics that include statistics, charts, graphs, and other information. If you need some examples, here are 197 infographics on the topic of content marketing curated by Michael Schmitz, head of Content Lab at Publicis, Munich. Infographics can be effective in that if one is good it can be passed around social media and posted on websites for years. You can get a professionally designed infographic by hiring a contractor on a site like oDesk or if you want to remove some of the risk you can go with a company like Visua.ly. A decent infographic will usually cost you at least $1,000 to have designed, but can cost several thousand dollars if you are hiring a contractor or agency to include strategy and planning, research, copywriting, and design. There is also the matter of promoting that infographic to bloggers and the media. Or you could set up a board on Pinterest and curate infographics on a topic related to your business. That is also a form of content marketing, and it costs nothing but your time. Hey, it worked for Michael.
At this stage, the work of the one or two content marketers on your team remains about the same as it does with a team of one -- content creation, SEO, and social media. Even if you decide to dedicate two hires to content marketing as Volpe suggests, to bifurcate responsibilities between those two employees is premature. Both employees should contribute to all three responsibilities, and leadership of the content marketing program is shared between those employees.
Your marketing plan should go beyond the types of content you'll create -- it should also cover you'll organize your content. With the help of an editorial calendar, you'll be on the right track for publishing a well-balanced and diverse content library on your website. Then, create a social media content calendar so you can promote and manage your content on other sites.

thank you for this. i used to be an in-house copywriter back when i was in the philippines and looking back, i have to accept that it was my best work ever (because it didn’t feel like work and was more like a way of life). i decided not to pursue it when i came to canada because i had other things in mind – mainly to build a family. though i am still happily married to the same husband who brought me here almost 15 years ago, we never had kids and i am just living a ho-hum life of a dispensable clerk in an insurance company. i survived two take-overs and am living on a not-so-bad clerk’s salary and the promise of a little pension when i get too old and creaky, but i have to admit that i still miss copywriting (especially when i get reminded of how my job is just sucking the life out of me.) there’s this big chunk of my heart that is raring to copywrite again but with a rusted out experience, i honestly don’t know how and where to start anew.
I read copious copy writing books by the masters (Dan Kennedy, Maria Veloso, Joe Vitale, Joe Sugarman, and more) until I felt that what I was reading was redundant (nothing new to learn) and began as a fledgling copywriter for the grand daddy of all on-hold phone message companies, earning their Employee of the Quarter the last two quarters I worked there.
This is the only course on the list that isn’t actually free, but it’s only $35 for 8 hours of videos, readings, and quizzes, which is pretty inexpensive for a Coursera course from the University of California, Irvine. This course is unique because it’s one of the few options that puts a heavy focus on the actual act of writing as opposed to content marketing.
This course is obviously best for B2B companies, but it’s worth mentioning because it’s one of the few good Udemy classes that are free. The course is by William Flanagan, CEO and Founder of Audienti, and it’s great because it uses actual scenarios that Flanagan has dealt with in his own business as well as his clients. There are six sections to the class, including Creating Interesting Relevant Content, Publishing Content for Conversion, and Getting Content in front of Your Audience.
Videos are a highly engaging content medium that are shareable across social media platforms and websites alike. Videos require a bigger investment of time and resources than written content, but as visual marketing increases in popularity -- after all, it's 40X more likely to get shared on social media than other types of content -- it's a medium worth experimenting with.
Do you wonder what makes viral marketing campaigns work? Learn how to market your ideas, brands or products in the most effective manner possible. Take the journey from word of mouth to online word of mouth with this course created by University of Pennsylvania. Professor Jonah Berger, an expert in the domain helps you understand how campaigns can become more shareable on social media and will teach you to create contagious content, develop sticky messages and get products to catch on.
Step 3: Brainstorm, then create your content marketing plan. Planning and creating new content isn’t just about mapping and metrics. Brainstorming and asset planning can be one of the most challenging and important parts of content creation. To catch inspiration when it strikes, you need a receptive environment, and team-wide willingness to try new things. An editorial calendar is not only where you keep track of, coordinate, and share your upcoming content, it is a strategic tool that helps your team execute integrated programs that include your content. Keeping an editorial calendar ensures that you’re releasing your content at the best possible moment, and that your whole team is aligned around the release dates. 
I stumbled across this in my search for copywriting courses. It seems like a good course, but just have a quick question. I’m a sorta recent graduate with a BA in Professional Writing. Bit of a struggle finding anyone to even give me an interview, so I thought if doing this and adding to my resume since I have an interest and love writing. I mostly want to know if this could be more of a help in aiding my job search or if I need to do more than one course.

These set of video tutorials have been specifically designed to explore the different writing styles and fundamental concepts of storytelling. Go through these 29 courses and choose the one that fits your requirement and experience level. With relevant demonstrations, sources of inspiration and advice for coming up with engaging ideas it is easy to see why these tutorials are crowd favorites.
Videos are a highly engaging content medium that are shareable across social media platforms and websites alike. Videos require a bigger investment of time and resources than written content, but as visual marketing increases in popularity -- after all, it's 40X more likely to get shared on social media than other types of content -- it's a medium worth experimenting with.

To accurately and efficiently isolate your target prospect's problems (which will illuminate the benefits most fascinating to them) start by answering a series of questions about their personal background, their company and the position they hold, and their challenges, goals, and shopping preferences. In other words, create a buyer persona. As a result, you’ll amass an abundance of invaluable information that you can then use to attract attention and inspire action.
Theory #1: The mere act of publishing content on a regular basis does a lot of the "distribution" work for you -- if you consider search engines a distribution channel. (Which I do, considering how often people use them to find content.) If you create content on a regular basis that's informed by keyword research and optimized for search, Google takes care of the rest of your content distribution plan.
Traditional marketers have long used content to disseminate information about a brand and build a brand's reputation. Taking advantage of technological advances in transportation and communication, business owners started to apply content marketing techniques in the late 19th century. They also attempted to build connections with their customers. For example:
If you would like to keep learning, upgrade to The Kopywriting Kourse to get god-like at copy. The full course is for people who want to dive much deeper into copywriting. The KopywritingKourse is a multi-part course designed to take you through all the mental tricks, hacks and formulas I use to develop high-selling copy. You also get weekly office hours where you get live help.
The easiest way to get started is to apply to write content for a content writing service or freelance job board. Content writing services create business relationships with companies that need content and provide writers to write that content. Freelance job boards are sites that allow writers to make individual profiles and vie for jobs posted directly by the client.

The key word here is “valuable.” It’s what changes this definition from one that could describe almost any form of advertising or marketing. You can tell if a piece of content is the sort that could be part of a content marketing campaign if people seek it out, if people want to consume it, rather than avoiding it. So was VW’s 2014 “Game Day” commercial, which has been viewed on YouTube almost 18 million times as of the writing of this post, an ad, or content marketing? The answer is it’s both, depending on how it’s received by each individual who is exposed to it. The same will apply to any piece of content marketing you create, depending on whether the recipient received value from it or not. Of course the goal is to provide as much value from your content marketing to as much of your target audience as possible. At this point, despite this definition and explanation, you’re probably still wondering what exactly content marketing is. We can get more clarity by considering a few examples.
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