I think each tries to accommodate for a worldwide audience. In general, as a copywriter, you need to be prepared to write for different audiences (and a worldwide audience), especially in this digital age. And the underlying principles of copywriting will be the same, wherever you learn them – but when you come to crafting the copy itself, you’ll just have to be aware of UK/US spelling and phrasing. Good question, Evan

Admit any data collection difficulties or incomplete sections. Your executive summary should also include a section where you explain whether or not you had any difficulty attaining the data within. This could help explain incomplete or omitted sections or topics. Sometimes, there's no way to obtain a certain set of data reliably. If this is the case, explain why it is so in your summary.
thank you for this. i used to be an in-house copywriter back when i was in the philippines and looking back, i have to accept that it was my best work ever (because it didn’t feel like work and was more like a way of life). i decided not to pursue it when i came to canada because i had other things in mind – mainly to build a family. though i am still happily married to the same husband who brought me here almost 15 years ago, we never had kids and i am just living a ho-hum life of a dispensable clerk in an insurance company. i survived two take-overs and am living on a not-so-bad clerk’s salary and the promise of a little pension when i get too old and creaky, but i have to admit that i still miss copywriting (especially when i get reminded of how my job is just sucking the life out of me.) there’s this big chunk of my heart that is raring to copywrite again but with a rusted out experience, i honestly don’t know how and where to start anew.

3) How better would we be able to convey a value proposition – In this step, the firm will decide on the policies that it would adopt. What sort of quality the firm would create and convey? In what capacity would it be advisable for the firm to incorporate its distinctive offices? Eventually, the firm chooses how to apply the concept of marketing to convey a better consumer experience.

thank you for this. i used to be an in-house copywriter back when i was in the philippines and looking back, i have to accept that it was my best work ever (because it didn’t feel like work and was more like a way of life). i decided not to pursue it when i came to canada because i had other things in mind – mainly to build a family. though i am still happily married to the same husband who brought me here almost 15 years ago, we never had kids and i am just living a ho-hum life of a dispensable clerk in an insurance company. i survived two take-overs and am living on a not-so-bad clerk’s salary and the promise of a little pension when i get too old and creaky, but i have to admit that i still miss copywriting (especially when i get reminded of how my job is just sucking the life out of me.) there’s this big chunk of my heart that is raring to copywrite again but with a rusted out experience, i honestly don’t know how and where to start anew.
On the opposite end of the spectrum, if you are a technical business, you should have common technical language and jargon that’s used within your industry to create credibility. If you’re a personal injury firm, you should use language that’s sensitive to car accident victims or families of victims that may have just experienced a traumatic situation.

Whereas SlideShares are typically visual, Kessler's is heavily focused on copy: The design stays constant, and only the text changes. But the copy is engaging and compelling enough for him to pull that off. Why? Because he uses simple words so his readers understand what he's trying to say without any effort. He writes like he speaks, and it reads like a story, making it easy to flip through in SlideShare form.
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