With the right tools in place, it’s easier to incorporate different channels into a comprehensive strategy. Use comprehensive analytics to capture details about your audience’s likes and dislikes, segment your users based on where they are in the customer journey, and deliver personalized messages across multiple channels. In the end, a combination of channels is the best way to keep users engaged and encourage long-term retention.
Derzeit verlässt sich das Unternehmen auf die bestehende fortschrittliche Technologie und den Ruf des Service. Wir haben viele Partner getroffen. In Zukunft werden wir mehr Aspekte des digitalen Marktes und des Internet-Marketings erweitern und unser Geschäft wird mehr Bereiche abdecken. Bemühen Sie sich, mit mehr Unternehmen zusammenzuarbeiten, um eine Win-Win-Situation zu erreichen.

Whereas SlideShares are typically visual, Kessler's is heavily focused on copy: The design stays constant, and only the text changes. But the copy is engaging and compelling enough for him to pull that off. Why? Because he uses simple words so his readers understand what he's trying to say without any effort. He writes like he speaks, and it reads like a story, making it easy to flip through in SlideShare form.


Secondly, push campaigns can fit in right beside other channels, like email or in-app messages. If your push provider is an integrated marketing platform, you’ll be able to track downstream conversions rather than just surface metrics like click through rates. Metrics like open rates are easily trackable through push notifications, making them a good fit for intricate campaigns.
Identify your customer. Before you can identify your customer's need or problem, you must identify your target or typical customer. Your target audience is the specific customer profile your are trying to reach. This could be people of a certain gender, age, profession, interest set, group, or any other quality that you think makes a customer want to buy your product. In other words, these are the people who are most likely to buy your product and the people that you tailor your marketing to.[2]

The personal finance site Mint.com used content marketing, specifically their personal finance blog MintLife, to build an audience for a product they planned to sell. According to entrepreneur Sachin Rekhi, Mint.com concentrated on building the audience for MintLife "independent of the eventual Mint.com product."[18] Content on the blog included how-to guides on paying for college, saving for a house, and getting out of debt. Other popular content included in-depth interviews and a series of financial disasters called "Trainwreck Tuesdays." The popularity of the site surged as did demand for the product. "Mint grew quickly enough to sell to Intuit for $170 million after three years in business. By 2013, the tool reached 10 million users, many of whom trusted Mint to handle their sensitive banking information because of the blog’s smart, helpful content."[19]

Ein solider Plan macht Ihr Marketing erfolgreicher und erleichtert die Umsetzung der geplanten Aktionen. Dieses Training hilft Ihnen bei der Erstellung eines Marketingplans und gibt Ihnen Tipps, wie Sie ihn am besten präsentieren. Lernen Sie, ein Team zusammenzustellen, die aktuelle Lage zu analysieren und Ihre Absichten und die damit verbundenen Aktionen strukturiert zu planen. Sie werden feststellen, dass Sie mit einem richtig aufgebauten Marketingplan Ihre Ziele schneller und effizienter erreichen werden.

In a Washington Post article by Chris Cillizza, it highlights some of the stats on how much content is actually consumed (and not consumed) by readers—and it’s pretty surprising. Cillizza claims that in a study conducted by the Media Insight Project, only 41 percent of Americans report that they watched, read or heard any in-depth news stories, beyond the headlines, in the last week.
Internal and external linking (where appropriate) doesn’t just tickle Google’s fancy—it also lets your users have the most fluid user experience possible. It empowers them to learn more about either your business (internal links) or about a relative topic to your business (external links) without them having to do any work themselves other than a click. Your website copy should include mostly internal links to other pages on your website, but other content (such as blogs, e-books, infographics, etc.), external links can be beneficial for helping educate your users, as well as get some “link juice” in return. Both demonstrate that your users’ best interests are top of mind.
If the answer to these is “no”, then it’s time to get rid of the fluff. Some people get caught up in the misconception that a website has to have tons of content to rank well in searches, but the reality is that unless it’s valuable and clear to the user, a surplus of content is only going to prevent them from taking an action (be it making a purchase, signing up for a newsletter, scheduling a consultation, etc.). And if that’s the ultimate goal—for users to take some kind of action—why would we want to make it harder for them to do so? Which leads me to my next point: don’t make them think—make them do.
James Chartrand is the owner of Men with Pens, a world-recognized business and major blog with more than 50,000 readers, and Damn Fine Words, where she (yes, she) teaches content-creation techniques to writers and business owners. She’s partial to strong coffee and fine Shiraz, loves ice skating, and is never seen without a pair of Nike sneakers on her feet.
Quite simply, using the word “you” makes people’s ears perk up a little. As a species, humans are wired to think about what’s in our best interest when making decisions—so naturally, we gravitate toward content that speaks directly to us. It makes us feel special, included and connected because the writing is more personal, conversational and relatable.
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