Mike Anthony is a trade marketing expert. Something of a pioneer in shopper marketing after a 17-year career in consumer goods, Mike is the CEO of engage, a company that helps organisations create the insight and strategy required to drive their marketing and sales efforts. And he was kind enough to reveal some insights on the history of trade marketing.
Content marketing attracts prospects and transforms prospects into customers by creating and sharing valuable free content. Content marketing helps companies create sustainable brand loyalty, provides valuable information to consumers, and creates a willingness to purchase products from the company in the future. This relatively new form of marketing does not involve direct sales. Instead, it builds trust and rapport with the audience.[2]

Each time you refresh the login page, you see a different, equally clever example email belonging to a fictional character, like Ender from Ender's Game and Dana Scully from The X-Files -- a great example of nostalgia marketing. This is a small detail, but nonetheless a reminder that there are real humans behind the website and product's design. Delightful microcopy like this kinda feels like I just shared a private joke with someone at the company.


In 1933, Procter & Gamble started to broadcast a radio serial drama sponsored by their Oxydol soap powder. The owners wanted to build brand loyalty by aiming to adult women. They could intermix their marketing messages into the serial drama. The term soap opera was born in this year, and they marked a precedent for native ads. Engagement with the audience was a key element with the creation of this content.
No post from me about excellent copywriting would be complete without mentioning the folks at Velocity Partners. A B2B marketing agency out of the U.K., we've featured co-founder Doug Kessler's SlideShares (like this one on why marketers need to rise above the deluge of "crappy" content) time and again on this blog because he's the master of word economy.
In a Washington Post article by Chris Cillizza, it highlights some of the stats on how much content is actually consumed (and not consumed) by readers—and it’s pretty surprising. Cillizza claims that in a study conducted by the Media Insight Project, only 41 percent of Americans report that they watched, read or heard any in-depth news stories, beyond the headlines, in the last week.
A wise marketer once said: copy is design. And we couldn’t agree more: the shape, flow, and feel of your argument forms the best architecture of a page—and visual design pours in to animate it. Of course, we’re happy to generate ideas with our visually-oriented counterparts. But please resist lorem ipsum text. That leaves copy as an afterthought—and invariably sells your story short.

On March 6, 2012, Dollar Shave Club launched their online video campaign. In the first 48 hours of their video debuting on YouTube they had over 12,000 people signing up for the service. The video cost just $4500 to make and as of November 2015 has had more than 21 million views. The video was considered as one of the best viral marketing campaigns of 2012 and won "Best Out-of-Nowhere Video Campaign" at the 2012 AdAge Viral Video Awards.
Each time you refresh the login page, you see a different, equally clever example email belonging to a fictional character, like Ender from Ender's Game and Dana Scully from The X-Files -- a great example of nostalgia marketing. This is a small detail, but nonetheless a reminder that there are real humans behind the website and product's design. Delightful microcopy like this kinda feels like I just shared a private joke with someone at the company.
Traditional marketers have long used content to disseminate information about a brand and build a brand's reputation. Taking advantage of technological advances in transportation and communication, business owners started to apply content marketing techniques in the late 19th century. They also attempted to build connections with their customers. For example:
An understanding of keywords and search engine behavior are important for SEO when writing copy for the web. This means copy for a website may have to contain certain keywords that people search when looking for something. If those keywords are used properly and in the proper places within the article, more traffic will come to the website via a search engine, and the owner of the website could have the potential of making more money.

Inhaltsvermarktung, Bosch Gruppe Inhaltsvermarktung, PwC Inhaltsvermarktung, CHECK24 Inhaltsvermarktung, ProSiebenSat.1 Media SE Inhaltsvermarktung, Statista GmbH Inhaltsvermarktung, Chrono24 GmbH Inhaltsvermarktung, ANDREAS STIHL AG & Co. KG Inhaltsvermarktung, 1&1 IONOS Inhaltsvermarktung, Campusjäger GmbH Inhaltsvermarktung, Bankpower GmbH Inhaltsvermarktung, 4flow Inhaltsvermarktung, infoscore Forderungsmanagement GmbH
An understanding of keywords and search engine behavior are important for SEO when writing copy for the web. This means copy for a website may have to contain certain keywords that people search when looking for something. If those keywords are used properly and in the proper places within the article, more traffic will come to the website via a search engine, and the owner of the website could have the potential of making more money.

Quite simply, using the word “you” makes people’s ears perk up a little. As a species, humans are wired to think about what’s in our best interest when making decisions—so naturally, we gravitate toward content that speaks directly to us. It makes us feel special, included and connected because the writing is more personal, conversational and relatable.
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