In Steve Krug’s book Don’t Make Me Think, Revisited: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (as well as in the first and second editions of this series), Krug talks about the importance of making things as simple as humanly possible for website visitors. Although a lot of the material covered speaks to web designers, it is also helpful for content developers and marketers as well. 
Whereas SlideShares are typically visual, Kessler's is heavily focused on copy: The design stays constant, and only the text changes. But the copy is engaging and compelling enough for him to pull that off. Why? Because he uses simple words so his readers understand what he's trying to say without any effort. He writes like he speaks, and it reads like a story, making it easy to flip through in SlideShare form.
Finally, push notifications enjoy fewer technical and legal limitations than SMS. In the US, the Federal Communications Commission regulates mass promotional messages on email and SMS. Companies must tread carefully when delivering text messages to users who haven’t opted in. SMS content is also limited to 160 characters. Neither limitation is applicable to push notifications, making it a good channel for promotional messages.
Secondly, push campaigns can fit in right beside other channels, like email or in-app messages. If your push provider is an integrated marketing platform, you’ll be able to track downstream conversions rather than just surface metrics like click through rates. Metrics like open rates are easily trackable through push notifications, making them a good fit for intricate campaigns.
But sometimes what I love the most, is just blogging about what I want to blog about. It’s that complete freedom to explore unknown creative or linguistic territories – with no brief to follow or project manager breathing down my neck. I’m definitely going to make more time to knock up fabulous blog posts in the near future and distant future. So watch this space 🙂

Because of these differences, website copywriters often have to have both a writing background and a marketing background. A person who is acting as a website copywriter for a site that is trying to sell something usually needs to be able to write active prose that inspires action. They also need to be able to drive traffic to the site, so that customers can see the products for sale.
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