Professional content writers create written content for a living. A professional writer should be competent and skillful, and they should be engaged in writing as their main paid occupation.[1] As a content writer, you may write content on a variety of topics for a variety of organizations, from popular websites to scientific and technical print documents or manuals. The benefits of being a professional content writer includes being paid for an activity you enjoy (writing), and as you become more established, the ability to work remotely or from a home office.
When the marketing team starts to grow, who leads content marketing gets more interesting. With a team of three marketers, you can approach content marketing a couple ways. Either one person can own content marketing activities, while the other two own activities that align more with the middle- and bottom-of the funnel. Or, two people can own content marketing activities, while the third owns the rest.

A web copywriter for more than a decade, I’ve written website copy for more than 40 different industries in various roles: full time at an ad agency, as an in-house copywriter on the client side, exclusively with an SEO company, and freelance. I know my strengths and my limits. I have a clear idea of the types of web content I write best. And I know the types of companies I want to work with. If you are having a hard time finding the right freelance copywriter (or even web developer, for that matter) talk to me. If I’m not the right copywriter for you, I’ll tell you. And then I’ll do my best to help you find the right person for the job.
While successful content writers seem to have an enviable life -- they work from home, make their own schedules and work as much or as little as they please -- the vast majority have a hard time making a living of it. They lack the skills necessary to succeed. Because no matter how talented they are, writing skill is simply not enough. So, if you want to become successful as a content writer, you need a full toolkit of marketable skills.
The content you create should be shared on the social networks on which you're active. (And if you're not active on any, this is one of the reasons to get started.) Moreover, Google's algorithm considers social signals as one of its most important ranking factors -- socially shared content is a vote of approval, or at the very least importance, so it makes sense Google would consider it when deciding whether a post should rank well in organic search.
On March 6, 2012, Dollar Shave Club launched their online video campaign. In the first 48 hours of their video debuting on YouTube they had over 12,000 people signing up for the service. The video cost just $4500 to make and as of November 2015 has had more than 21 million views. The video was considered as one of the best viral marketing campaigns of 2012 and won "Best Out-of-Nowhere Video Campaign" at the 2012 AdAge Viral Video Awards.
In this lesson, you'll take a critical look at the inside of a company. First you'll see how to develop "marketing" projects for audiences within a company. Then you'll explore the roles of the various specialists who contribute to a single marketing piece—bosses, clients, editors, junior writers, artists, and designers. You'll learn how to work with all of them to create smoother relationships and better projects.
Check your local college or university for a technical writing certificate program. Look at the faculty of the program to confirm you are being taught by professionals in the field or working content writers who are familiar with the demands of the writing industry. Certificate programs can be beneficial for writers who are new to content writing or technical writing.[6]
In 1933, Procter & Gamble started to broadcast a radio serial drama sponsored by their Oxydol soap powder. The owners wanted to build brand loyalty by aiming to adult women. They could intermix their marketing messages into the serial drama. The term soap opera was born in this year, and they marked a precedent for native ads. Engagement with the audience was a key element with the creation of this content.

Make sure someone else checks for errors    Consider asking several people to look over the publication. You need impartial help of two kinds. First, ask someone who is similar to your target audience to review your work and tell you whether the message is coming across clearly. Are they hooked? Does it leave them with unanswered questions? Second, ask someone to proofread for you. Misspellings, typos, and poor grammar reflect poorly on your business.

To accurately and efficiently isolate your target prospect's problems (which will illuminate the benefits most fascinating to them) start by answering a series of questions about their personal background, their company and the position they hold, and their challenges, goals, and shopping preferences. In other words, create a buyer persona. As a result, you’ll amass an abundance of invaluable information that you can then use to attract attention and inspire action.
Add value. That’s the secret. It’s not really a secret at all. We've already talked about it throughout this piece. Although when you look at some of the marketing companies engage in you wonder if they’re purposely avoiding the obvious. We skip advertising when it provides little to no value. If you want to learn about advertising that doesn’t get skipped, find a skateboarder and ask him if you can watch him look through a skateboard magazine. You’ll see that he spends as much time looking at the ads as he does looking at the articles and photos. Or check out The Berrics website. Much of the content is advertisements, but skaters don’t skip these videos, they watch them just like they watch the other videos, because they’re getting the value they want--good skating. As a skater I’d like to say skateboard companies pioneered content marketing decades ago, but I know they were only doing what came naturally, and selling more product was secondary to the fun of creating videos and magazines. If you want to hire someone onto your marketing team who understands content marketing intuitively, hiring a skateboarder might not be a bad step.
Copywriting should not be confused with “copyright.” Copyright means an individual or company has the exclusive legal right to reproduce, publish, sell, or distribute someone’s work (such as books, music, artistic items). The purpose of a copyright is to protect that material and prevent illegal use of it by unauthorized agents. The owner designates the material is copyrighted with the symbol ©.
“Working with Lisa was so easy. Using just my notes, she captured the spirit of my company and helped me say what I wanted to say, the way I wanted it said. She always responded quickly to my emails. And when I wanted to make small tweaks or change a word here and there, even after we thought the copy was set, she was happy to jump in again and make sure it turned out how I wanted it to. It was like a breath of fresh air after working with another copywriter who just wasn’t able to do what she did. I highly recommend Lisa’s copywriting services.”  --Laurie Luttrell, Owner of Laurelwood Designs
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