Consider moving to a large city full of copywriting job opportunities. If you don’t want to work remotely, it can be more difficult to find copywriting jobs, especially if you live in a small town or city. If you’re serious about copywriting, think about moving to a bigger city like New York, San Francisco, or Chicago where there are lots more job opportunities for copywriters.[17]


I read copious copy writing books by the masters (Dan Kennedy, Maria Veloso, Joe Vitale, Joe Sugarman, and more) until I felt that what I was reading was redundant (nothing new to learn) and began as a fledgling copywriter for the grand daddy of all on-hold phone message companies, earning their Employee of the Quarter the last two quarters I worked there.
Most people start out with blog posts, but if you want to venture out and try producing other content pieces, consider which ones you want to make. For instance, if you've been doing weekly blog posts for the past year, creating an ebook that distills all your blog posts into one ultimate guide would be a one way to offer information in a different format. We'll go over several different types of content you can use further down on the list.
Traditional marketers have long used content to disseminate information about a brand and build a brand's reputation. Taking advantage of technological advances in transportation and communication, business owners started to apply content marketing techniques in the late 19th century. They also attempted to build connections with their customers. For example:
It's important to do regular reporting -- I recommend monthly -- on each of these metrics so you know where your growth levers lie. Regular reporting also helps you identify negative trends or plateaus early-on so you can address them before they become bigger issues. Most importantly, however, tracking the success of your initiatives makes it easy for you to repeat what works, eliminate what doesn't, and promote the success of your content marketing program so you can justify its expansion, and its seat at the modern marketing table.

Theory #1: The mere act of publishing content on a regular basis does a lot of the "distribution" work for you -- if you consider search engines a distribution channel. (Which I do, considering how often people use them to find content.) If you create content on a regular basis that's informed by keyword research and optimized for search, Google takes care of the rest of your content distribution plan.


Do what Chuck Holmes suggests: write copy. Re-write the ads you come across in your life. Ask yourself “why did the copywriter take that approach? Why use that particular word? Why focus on that aspect?” Ruin your TV watching by studying the commercials. And give yourself some really challenging assignments, like writing copy for a car, for pharmaceutical, for a fashion line. Can you think in terms of imagery as well? How do images and words go together? Sound and music? Put yourself in the place of the intended audience for the ads you encounter, and the ones you practice on. Get a feel fo...

Make sure someone else checks for errors    Consider asking several people to look over the publication. You need impartial help of two kinds. First, ask someone who is similar to your target audience to review your work and tell you whether the message is coming across clearly. Are they hooked? Does it leave them with unanswered questions? Second, ask someone to proofread for you. Misspellings, typos, and poor grammar reflect poorly on your business.
I want to get into copywriting big time. I work with an Advertising Agency and have rather working knowledge of copywriting. If you have an assignment at hands can you share it with me. I’ll spend some time doing it and will share my copy with you. That way you can give me your inputs on how am I doing, what needs work and so on. You can give me a live assignment may be some of my thoughts will add to your existing thoughts!
Consider investing in a copywriting course. There are tons of online copywriting courses you can do from the comfort of your own home, and lots of them are even free of cost. If you’d rather learn copywriting in an actual classroom or community space, ask your local libraries, colleges, or community centers if they have copywriting courses you could take.[2]
I won't pull any punches: I started, and it took a while to stop. That is to say you're about to dive into a pretty in-depth post (that's a nice way of saying "long") about content marketing, one which you may want to bookmark to read later. But I think it covers most of the aspects of content marketing that modern inbound marketers need to consider, beyond the basics of simply writing content optimized for the web.
When tax season rolls around and people are Googling answers to their tax preparation questions, they stumble upon your blog posts, and realize you offer tax preparation services. Some of them keep doing their own tax preparation, but perhaps keep you in mind for next year; others throw their hands up in the air, decide to rid themselves of tax preparation headaches for good, and hire you -- because you're clearly way more qualified to do this than they are.

At this stage, the work of the one or two content marketers on your team remains about the same as it does with a team of one -- content creation, SEO, and social media. Even if you decide to dedicate two hires to content marketing as Volpe suggests, to bifurcate responsibilities between those two employees is premature. Both employees should contribute to all three responsibilities, and leadership of the content marketing program is shared between those employees.


Review : As a newbie to writing content I didn’t know much of anything when I started this course. I have a site with content, but my traffic is low. This course taught me what I am doing wrong ( which was mostly everything) and what to do to make it right. Also, I now have a great understanding of the field of content writing and what it takes to make it in the business. In my opinion this course over delivered on it’s promise. This is a great course, thanks Mike & Ken for sharing your knowledge. Peace. – Tim Wiesner

Step 3: Brainstorm, then create your content marketing plan. Planning and creating new content isn’t just about mapping and metrics. Brainstorming and asset planning can be one of the most challenging and important parts of content creation. To catch inspiration when it strikes, you need a receptive environment, and team-wide willingness to try new things. An editorial calendar is not only where you keep track of, coordinate, and share your upcoming content, it is a strategic tool that helps your team execute integrated programs that include your content. Keeping an editorial calendar ensures that you’re releasing your content at the best possible moment, and that your whole team is aligned around the release dates. 
Gather testimonials to help brand yourself as a copywriter. Whenever you finish a project for someone, ask them if they’ll write you a testimonial or review. Collecting testimonials from past clients, whether you worked for them in-person or online, will help you gather more clients in the future. Potential clients can read your testimonials and feel more confident that you’ll do a great job for them.[15]
Go back and read the content marketing definition one more time, but this time remove the relevant and valuable. That’s the difference between content marketing and the other informational garbage you get from companies trying to sell you “stuff.” Companies send us information all the time – it’s just that most of the time it’s not very relevant or valuable (can you say spam?). That’s what makes content marketing so intriguing in today’s environment of thousands of marketing messages per person per day.
Problem: I need to increase the volume of my organic search. Your audience can’t buy from you if they can’t find you, and today up to 93% of buying cycles start from a search engine. Additionally, according to Kuno Creative, 51% of content consumption derives from organic search, so content marketing is a great way to build organic awareness. When your valuable content ranks highly on search engines, or is shared widely on social networks, you’re building brand awareness at no cost, and since your content will only be shared when it’s relevant, your audience will be less inclined to tune it out. 

Most people start out with blog posts, but if you want to venture out and try producing other content pieces, consider which ones you want to make. For instance, if you've been doing weekly blog posts for the past year, creating an ebook that distills all your blog posts into one ultimate guide would be a one way to offer information in a different format. We'll go over several different types of content you can use further down on the list.


Case studies, also known as testimonials, are your opportunity to tell the story of a customer who succeeded in solving a problem by working with you. A case study is perhaps your most versatile type of content marketing because it can take many different forms -- some of which are on this list. That's right, case studies can take the form of a blog post, ebook, podcast ... even an infographic.
This is a great course. Nick explains everything clearly using great examples. Made me look at headlines very differently. I feel better able to have a go at writing more professional headlines now. Lots of useful exercises. I would have appreciated some model answers to the early exercises. Just to know if I was on the right track. – Malene Bertelsen
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