The content you create should be shared on the social networks on which you're active. (And if you're not active on any, this is one of the reasons to get started.) Moreover, Google's algorithm considers social signals as one of its most important ranking factors -- socially shared content is a vote of approval, or at the very least importance, so it makes sense Google would consider it when deciding whether a post should rank well in organic search.

Once you've been regularly publishing content on your own site for a while, it might be time to start thinking about distributing your content on other sites. This could mean repurposing content into new formats and publishing them on your blog, creating original content specifically for external sites -- such as Medium -- or publishing website content on various social networks.
Coursera courses are on the rise. The education platform partners with top Universities and organizations worldwide and makes it easy for anyone to sign up (similarly to Udemy, except it’s a bit pricier and works with colleges and universities). Coursera also has one of the largest libraries of courses in all different categories, so this is one of my favorite platforms.

Marketing professionals need to know the art of conversation. They know to mirror the tone of the people they are talking to and to tailor their language as well. The average American reads at the grade-school level, so that means that you must develop writing strategies that speak to the reader in simple, direct terms (see also: Don't Be a Content Snob: Listen to What Your Audience Wants). Writing the way people talk is necessary, even if copy is filled with fragmented sentences.
Starting a podcast will help audiences find your brand if they don't have time or interest in reading content every day. The number of podcast listeners is growing -- in 2018, nearly one-third of the U.S. population has listened to a podcast in the last month. If you have interesting people to interview or conversations to host, consider podcasting as another content format to experiment with.
This might seem unconventional, but part of content marketing is knowing how to take advantage of all WordPress has to offer. This is important for SEO as well as user experience. The course covers posts vs. pages, the Content Editor, media files, categories and tags, content widgets, and more confusing little options you have. It’s definitely a basic course and best for beginners, but necessary if you have any questions about what WordPress can offer.

I think each tries to accommodate for a worldwide audience. In general, as a copywriter, you need to be prepared to write for different audiences (and a worldwide audience), especially in this digital age. And the underlying principles of copywriting will be the same, wherever you learn them – but when you come to crafting the copy itself, you’ll just have to be aware of UK/US spelling and phrasing. Good question, Evan

To explain how content marketing works, we first have to agree on a definition. Unfortunately, I might've sent myself on a fool's errand -- I went through dozens of different iterations of a content marketing definition (including the somewhat flippant "content marketing is using content for marketing") and found none of them totally satisfactory. But I hate to let perfection get in the way of progress, so let's just get something down on paper so we have a basis for discussion:
Review : As a newbie to writing content I didn’t know much of anything when I started this course. I have a site with content, but my traffic is low. This course taught me what I am doing wrong ( which was mostly everything) and what to do to make it right. Also, I now have a great understanding of the field of content writing and what it takes to make it in the business. In my opinion this course over delivered on it’s promise. This is a great course, thanks Mike & Ken for sharing your knowledge. Peace. – Tim Wiesner
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